Safeguarding Lathes

Lathes are often overlooked when Risk Assessments are conducted to determine appropriate “Machine Safeguarding.” OSHA regulations consider lathes to be a 1910.212 machine, saying to the employer, “One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area from hazards such as those created by point of operation, ingoing nip points, rotating parts, flying chips, and sparks” … but 1910.212 requirements are vague because they cover such a wide variety of machinery. Therefore, a reference to something more detailed, like ANSI B11.6 on metalworking lathes, is required for specific safeguarding alternatives.

From a practical standpoint, the rotating chuck (work-holder) cannot be fully enclosed, unlike gears, sprockets, or chains which can and usually are completely covered, often by the machine’s manufacturer. However, that same lathe manufacturer may provide no safeguarding at or near the point of operation.

Hinged chuck-shields are one of the most common methods to protect lathe operators from the rotating work-holder. Their purpose is to prevent an operator from inadvertently coming in contact with the chuck, which often results in entanglement with it, resulting in serious injury or even death. Chuck shields are commercially available from numerous providers. They may be constructed of metal, polycarbonate, or some combination of materials. When not in use, they need to be swung up out of the way, so most are hinged. Although U.S. Safety Standards and Regulations do not require chuck-shields to be electrically interlocked, some European manufacturers offer that feature. With electrically interlocked shields, when the lathe chuck shield is lifted up, the positive contacts on the microswitch open, sending a stop signal to the machine control. The machine will not start up again until the emergency stop button has been reset.

Another type of protection commonly used on lathes is a chip/coolant shield. These are often useful when the operator’s personal protective equipment (PPE) does not adequately control the waste product coming off of the cutting tool. If chips strike the operator in the upper body or accumulate on the floor creating a slip-trip hazard, a chip/coolant shield is often suggested to supplement the operator’s PPE. OSHA’s 1910.219 addresses the need to cover rotating components to prevent the operator’s hair and clothing from getting entangled, dragging them into the machine. These rotating components include the lead screw, feed rod, traverse rod, and camshaft, in the lower front portion of the lathe.

In April 2011, a lathe’s horizontal rotating components took the life of a 22-year old female student at Yale University’s Sterling Chemistry Laboratory. While working very late at night by herself, her hair became entangled in that part of the machine, resulting in asphyxiation. (Google; Yale Lathe Fatality)

Telescopic metal sleeves are available to cover a lathe’s horizontal rotating components, although many manufacturing companies elect not to use them. According to feedback from OSHA Compliance Officers and Insurance Loss Control Inspectors, one of the most common lathe accidents results from the misuse of the standard chuck wrench furnished by the lathe manufacturer.

When the lathe is not being used, a typical (unsafe) storage place for the chuck-wrench is in the chuck. At some point in time, the operator turns the lathe on without checking to see where the chuck wrench is located, which sends it flying. This has caused serious accidents, including the loss of eyes. Spring-loaded, self-ejecting chuck wrenches are a solution to this problem because they won’t stay in the chuck by themselves. They are available in a number of sizes.

Many older lathes also need updates to bring them up to code with electrical standards like NFPA 79. The two most common updates are for: 1) magnetic motor-starters to provide dropout protection, (a.k.a. anti-restart), and 2) main power disconnects that lock only in the OFF position. As with any machine, provision for Lockout/Tagout is always important.

Danger and Warning signs, depicting specific hazards on lathes are also available.

To see these and other lathe safeguarding products, please call 1-800-922-7533 or visit https://www.rockfordsystems.com/product/protector-series-shields/

Got Grinders? Get Safeguarding

Safeguarding Standards for Bench and Pedestal Grinders

Grinders are one of the most frequently cited machines during OSHA machine-safety inspections. This is frequently due to improperly adjusted work-rests and tongue-guards on bench/pedestal grinders, as well as a lack of ring-testing for the grinding wheels.

OSHA 29 CFR SubPart O 1910.215 is a “machine specific” (vertical) regulation with a number of requirements, which if left unchecked, are often cited by OSHA as violations. ANSI B11.9-2010 (Grinders) and ANSI B7.1 2000 (Abrasive Wheels) also apply.

Work-Rests and Tongue-Guards
OSHA specifies that work-rests must be kept adjusted to within 1/8-inch of the wheel, to prevent the workpiece from being jammed between the wheel and the rest, resulting in potential wheel breakage. Because grinders run at such a high RPM, wheels actually explode when they break, causing very serious injury, like blindness and even death.

In addition, the distance between the grinding wheel and the adjustable tongue-guard (also known as a “spark arrestor”) must never exceed 1/4-inch. Because the wheel wears down during use, both these dimensions must be regularly checked/adjusted.

“Grinder safety gauges” can be used during the installation, maintenance, and inspection of bench/pedestal grinders to make sure the work-rests and tongue-guards comply with OSHA’s 1910.215 regulation and ANSI standards. Wait until the wheel has completely stopped and the Grinder is properly “Locked Out” before using a “grinder safety gauge”. Grinder coast-down time takes several minutes, which tempts employees to use the “grinder safety gauge” while the wheel is still rotating. This practice is very dangerous because it can cause wheel breakage.

Where grinders are concerned, personal protective equipment (PPE) usually means a full face-shield, not just safety glasses. You cannot be too careful with a machine that operates at several thousand RPM.

Remember, you must DOCUMENT any and all safety requirements set forth by OSHA, as that is their best evidence that safety procedures are really being followed.

Ring-Testing
OSHA says that you must “ring-test” grinding wheels before mounting them to prevent the inadvertent mounting of a cracked grinding wheel.

Ring Testing
Ring-Testing involves suspending the grinding wheel by its center hole, then tapping the side of the wheel with a non-metallic object. This should produce a bell tone if the wheel is intact. A thud, or a cracked-plate sound indicates a cracked wheel. NEVER mount a cracked wheel.

For larger grinders, grinding wheels are laid flat on a vibration-table, with sand evenly spread over the wheel. If the wheel is cracked, the sand moves away from the crack.

To prevent cracking a wheel during the mounting procedure, employees must be very carefully trained in those procedures. This starts with making sure the wheel is properly matched to that particular grinder, using proper blotters and spacers, and knowing exactly how much pressure to exert with a torque-wrench, just to mention a few things.

This OSHA-compliant “Wheel-Cover” allows no more than 90 degrees (total) of the wheel left exposed. (65 degrees from horizontal plane to the top of wheel-cover)
Never exceed these wheel-cover maximum opening dimensions. Larger wheel-cover openings create a wider pattern of flying debris should the wheel explode. A well-recognized safety precaution on bench/pedestal grinders is to stand well off to the side of the wheel for the first full minute before using the machine. Accidents have shown that grinding wheels are most likely to shatter/explode during that first minute.

There is an OSHA Instruction Standard #STD 1-12.8 October 30, 1978 addressing the conditional and temporary removal of the “Work Rest” for use only with larger piece parts based on the condition that “Side Guards” are provided. If this may apply to your grinder(s), make sure that you read the entire thing on OSHA.gov.

Safety Information
Grinding Wheels are Safe… Use but Don’t Abuse

Do

  • Do always Handle and Store wheels in a careful manner
  • Do Visually Inspect all the wheels before mounting for possible damage
  • Do Make Sure Operating Speed of machine Does Not Exceed speed marked on wheel, its blotter or container
  • Do Check Mounting Flanges for equal size, relieved as required & correct diameter
  • Do Use Mounting Blotters when supplied with wheels
  • Do be sure Work Rest is properly Adjusted on bench pedestal, and floor stand grinders
  • Do always Use Safety Guard that covers a minimum of one-half the grinding wheel
  • Do allow Newly Mounted Wheels to run at operating speed, with guard in place, for at least one minute before grinding
  • Do always Wear Safety Glasses or some type of approved eye protection while grinding
  • Do Turn Off Coolant before stopping wheel to avoid creating an out-of-balance condition

Don’t

  • Don’t use a wheel that has been Dropped or appears to have been abused
  • Don’t Force a wheel onto a machine Or Alter the size of the mounting hole – If a wheel won’t fit the machine, get one that will
  • Don’t ever Exceed Maximum Operating Speed established for the wheel
  • Don’t use mounting flanges on which the bearing surfaces Are Not Clean, Flat And Smooth
  • Don’t Tighten the mounting nut Excessively
  • Don’t grind on the Side of conventional, straight or Type 1 wheels
  • Don’t Start the machine Until the Safety Guard is properly and securely In Place
  • Don’t Jam work into the wheel
  • Don’t Stand Directly In Front of a grinding wheel whenever a grinder is started
  • Don’t grind material for which the Wheel Is Not Designed

Source: Grinding Wheel Institute

Rockford Systems Can Help
Rockford Systems offers a wide variety of safeguarding products for grinders.

Grinder Safety Gauge

Bench Grinder Safety Gauge
The bench grinder safety gauge is laser-cut, Grade 5052 aluminum with H32 hardness. The safety yellow, durable powder-coated gauge has silk-screened text and graphics. The bench grinder safety gauge measures 2 3/4-inches wide by 2 1/4-inches high by .1000-inches thick and has a 1/4-inch hole for attachment to the bench grinder.

Standard Mount Grinder Shields
These standard mount grinder shields are available in various sizes for protection from the swarf of bench or pedestal grinders. The frames are constructed of reinforced fiber nylon or heavy cast aluminum. Each shield is furnished with a threaded support rod. The transparent portion of the standard mount grinder shields is made of high-impact resistant polycarbonate to minimize scratching and provide durability.

Direct-Mount or Magnetic-Mount Bench Grinder Shields with Flexible Arms

Double-Wheel and Single-Wheel Bench Grinder Shields
Double-wheel bench grinder shields provide protection for both wheels of the grinder with one continuous shield. The durable shield is made of clear, 3/16-inch-thick polycarbonate and measures 18-inch x 6-inch. A special shield bracket adds stability to the top of the shield. The single-wheel bench grinder shield is made of clear, 3/16-inch-thick polycarbonate and measures 6-inch x 6-inch. This sturdy, impact-resistant shield is designed for use when a single wheel needs safeguarding. These shields have a direct-mount base that attaches directly to the grinder table or pedestal.

PROTECTOR Grinder Shield
PROTECTOR Series Shields for Grinders
Electrically Interlocked Grinder and Tool Grinder Shields
These electrically interlocked grinder and tool grinder shields are ideal for single- and double-wheel grinders. When the heavy-duty shield is swung out of position, the positive contacts on the microswitch open, sending a stop signal to the machine control. The safety microswitch electrical wires are furnished with a protective sheath and connect to the safety circuit of the machine that switches off the control to the movement of the grinding wheel. All safety micro switches are mounted in a tamper-resistant NEMA 4 housing with an enclosure rating of IP 67. The multi-adjustable, hexagonal steel arm structure allows easy mounting on the most diverse grinders. A versatile clamp allows horizontal and vertical adjustment of the shield. All electrically interlocked grinder and tool grinder shields consist of a high impact-resistant, transparent polycarbonate shield with an aluminum profile support and provide operator protection from flying chips and coolant.

Single-Phase Disconnect Switch

Single-Phase Disconnect Switch and Magnetic Motor Starter
This single-phase unit is designed for motors that have built-in over-loads. Typical applications for these combinations include smaller crimping machines, grinders, drill presses, and all types of saws. The 115-V, 15-A disconnect switch and non-reversing magnetic motor starter are housed in a NEMA-12 enclosure. Enclosure size is 8″ x 6″ x 3 1/2″. It includes a self-latching red emergency-stop palm button and a green motor control start push button. It can be used on machines with 115-V and is rated up to 1/2 HP maximum. The disconnect switch has a rotary operating handle which is lockable in the off position only. This meets OSHA and ANSI standards. For machines with 230-V AC single-phase motors, a transformer is required to reduce the control circuit voltage to 115-V AC in order to comply with NFPA 79.

Danger Sign for Cutting and Turning Machines
Don’t forget to post the appropriate danger signs near all machinery in the plant. The purpose of danger signs is to warn personnel of the danger of bodily injury or death. The suggested procedure for mounting this sign is as follows:
1) Sign must be clearly visible to the operator and other personnel
2) Sign must be at or near eye level
3) Sign must be PERMANENTLY fastened with bolts or rivets

Please call 1-800-922-7533 or visit www.rockfordsystems.com for more information.